Posted in Leslie Archer, The Girl At The Border

The Girl At The Border – Leslie Archer

border

One girl missing, one woman searching, both equally lost. Will a shared tragedy help them find their way home—even in the face of imminent danger?

Renowned archaeologist Richard Mathis is half a world away on the island of Crete when he learns his daughter, Bella, has gone missing. Within twenty minutes, he’s on his way back to the States. Two days later, he’s dead.

Richard’s young assistant, Angela Chase, is devastated by the loss of the man who had become both mentor and friend, and she’s determined to find the missing girl, who seems to have made dangerous connections—and whose lonely childhood so resembles Angela’s own. Born Laurel Springfield, Angela now spends her days digging up the origins of a lost civilization while struggling to keep her own past buried. But will the search for Bella expose Angela’s carefully disguised identity—and will she find Bella before she’s lost forever?’

I’m in two minds about this book – on the one hand, I really enjoyed the story, and I was gripped by the events that unfolded throughout the book. However, how the story unfolds is messy and complicated to follow, as it takes place through various person narratives and different timelines, featuring flashbacks to the near and further past.

Usually various narratives don’t bother me, nor do flashbacks, but unfortunately I just feel that they weren’t done very well in this book. There was little to no indication of just what timeline we were in, or who was narrating it, it was only when a few details were revealed further into each chapter that it was obvious. Maybe I just like things spoon fed to me, but I felt that a little detail at the top of each chapter just indicating who we were with and when would have made the story easier to follow.

The story itself was interesting. From an archaeological dig in Crete to the darker world of New York, we encounter hitmen, drug taking parents, neglected children, and a chilling look into the world of ISIS and the racism and fear that can be so prevalent amongst people.

There was a lot going on in this story, and it takes a long time to get to know the main character, Angela, and to find out exactly what happened in her past. The mystery around her and her story is well written, it’s tense, and I found I really wanted to find out just who she was.

Bella, who in many ways is a similar character to Angela, which is touched upon many times in the book, is a much more sympathetic character, a teenager who doesn’t get the love or affection she needs from either of her parents, the absent father and the mother who just never seemed able to bond with her. She is flailing through her life, and needs to find something or someone solid to cling onto. Her story is also very interesting to watch unfold.

Overall, I did enjoy this book – the story was gripping, the characters were interesting, and there were some parts of it that were genuinely chilling, and very reflective of the events happening in the world right now, which perhaps adds to the tension and uneasy feeling in the book. The only thing I didn’t like about the book is, like I said before, the slightly messy and hard to follow way it was written.

I would recommend it, especially to people who like a chilling mystery novel, and interesting female characters.

*I received this e-book from Netgalley in return for an honest review

5 thoughts on “The Girl At The Border – Leslie Archer

    1. Yes there is a lot, and I’ve read multiple other reviews of this that say they think the author is trying to cram too much into the book – I didn’t really think that, I thought the events meshed well together, it was just the scrambled timelines that were a bit confusing! Thanks for the comment ☺️

      Liked by 1 person

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